Ariane Hegewisch, M.Phil.

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About Ariane Hegewisch

Ariane Hegewisch is Program Director of Employment and Earnings at IWPR and Scholar in Residence at American University; prior to that she spent two years at IWPR as a scholar-in-residence. She came to IWPR from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on workplace discrimination and is a specialist in comparative human resource management, with a focus on policies and legislative approaches to facilitate greater work life reconciliation and gender equality, in the US and internationally. Prior to coming to the USA she taught comparative European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK where she was a founding researcher of the Cranet Survey of International HRM, the largest independent survey of human resource management policies and practices, covering 25 countries worldwide. She started her career  in local economic development, developing strategies for greater gender equality in employment and training in  local government in the UK. She has published many papers and articles and co-edited several books, including ‘Women, work and inequality: The challenge of equal pay in a deregulated labour market”. She is German and has a BSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and an MPhil in Development Studies from the IDS, Sussex.

Economy Adds More Jobs for Women Than Men, But Women Still 8 Million Jobs-on-Payroll Below February and Majority of All Who Lost Jobs

DOWNLOAD REPORT The economy added 4.8 million to [...]

Women Gain Disproportionately Fewer Jobs in May, and Face Disproportionately Higher Job Losses since February

DOWNLOAD REPORT As the Economy Starts to Grow [...]

Child Care Supports For The Construction Trades: Building and Sustaining Diversity in Oregon

The construction industry in Oregon is booming. Employment has grown steadily since 2010 and is now higher than during the pre-recession boom (Simonson 2019b). Yet, meeting demand is difficult for many companies. In a recent survey, close to 90 percent of construction industry employers in Oregon

By |2020-08-10T14:28:37+00:00May 26, 2020|Briefing Paper, Job Quality and Income Security|Comments Off on Child Care Supports For The Construction Trades: Building and Sustaining Diversity in Oregon

Breadwinner Mothers by Race/Ethnicity

The large majority of mothers in the United States are in the labor force making their economic contribution vital for their families’ economic security. One in two of the over 30 million families with children under 18 in the United States have a breadwinner mother, who is either a single mother, irrespective of earnings, or a married mother contributing at least 40 percent of the couple’s joint earnings;

By |2020-07-24T15:47:28+00:00May 8, 2020|Quick Figure, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Economy|Comments Off on Breadwinner Mothers by Race/Ethnicity

Dramatic Decline in Employment Hits Women Even More Severely than Men

In the four weeks since mid-March, 20.5 million jobs were lost, according to new payroll data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics this Friday, May 8. Women bore the majority of job losses, 11.3 million (55 percent of the total), compared with 9.2 million jobs lost by men

By |2020-07-25T20:02:54+00:00May 8, 2020|Employment and Earnings, Quick Figure|Comments Off on Dramatic Decline in Employment Hits Women Even More Severely than Men

Women Lost More Jobs than Men in almost all Sectors of the Economy

Employment data released on Friday, April 3 show dramatic job losses and sharp rises in unemployment for both women and men since February. Altogether 701,000 jobs were lost, the majority (58.8 percent or 412,188) by women. While these estimates of job losses are already outdated – since their collection in the second week of March new applications for unemployment reached almost ten times that level–they point to the critical role of gender in understanding the impact of the COVID -19 crisis.

By |2020-07-25T20:06:38+00:00April 6, 2020|Employment and Earnings, Quick Figure|Comments Off on Women Lost More Jobs than Men in almost all Sectors of the Economy

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2019

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 125 occupations.

By |2020-07-25T20:04:37+00:00March 24, 2020|Employment and Earnings, Fact Sheet|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2019

The Gender Wage Gap: 2019 Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

The gender wage gap in weekly earnings for full-time workers in the United States narrowed marginally between 2018 and 2019. In 2019, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 81.5 percent, an increase of 0.4 percent since 2018, when the ratio was 81.1 percent, leaving a wage gap of 18.5 percent, compared with 18.9 percent in 2018.

By |2020-07-25T20:05:44+00:00March 10, 2020|Employment and Earnings, Fact Sheet|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap: 2019 Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

Geographic Mobility, Gender, and the Future of Work

Geographically, economic opportunity is unequally distributed across the United States. A disproportionate share of all private-sector jobs—one in five—are located in just four metropolitan areas: New York, San Francisco, Chicago, and Seattle.

By |2020-07-26T17:21:16+00:00December 19, 2019|Employment and Earnings, Report|Comments Off on Geographic Mobility, Gender, and the Future of Work

Gender Inequality, Work Hours, and the Future of Work

Gender differences in paid and unpaid time at work are an important aspect of gender inequality. Women tend to spend more time on unpaid household and family care work, and men spend more time in paid work. This unequal distribution of time creates barriers to women’s advancement at work and reduces women’s economic security.

By |2020-07-26T17:47:55+00:00November 14, 2019|Employment and Earnings, Report|Comments Off on Gender Inequality, Work Hours, and the Future of Work